Sami communities

The population of the Sami communities has their own flag (see image).

The flag was introduced in 1986, and represents the Sami people in the four countries Norway, Sweden, Finland and Russia.

Some of the most unique places in Norway is the Sami villages Karasjok and Kautokeino in Finnmark county.

The climate in the Finnmarksvidda is drier than the coastal climate, and the winter temperature can get very low.

The lowest temperature ever measured in Norway is Karasjok with −51,4°C in 1886. The highest temperature in Karasjok is 32,4°C. Karasjok, in Sami writing Kárášjohka, is also a municipality, and the village Karasjok is the administrative centre of the municipality.

Kautokeino photo: Kautokeino kommune


Kautokeino, or Guovdageaidnu in Sami language , is another important community, and is both a municipality and a village.

About 2000 of the total population are living in the village. The village is in the middle of the Arctic Highlands, and has quite unique climate, with just a few weeks of summer with sun 24 hours a day, and then 6 long weeks of cold, snowy winters, when the sun is totally hidden under the horizon.

Kautokeino is the largest municipality in Norway when it comes to area, with 9.708 km2 , and reindeer herding is very important in this district.


The official languages are Sami and bokmål. Kautokeino and Karasjok are the two most important Sami cultural centres in Norway.

Sámi and Norwegian languages has equal status in the administrative districts Kautokeino, Nesseby, Tana, Kåfjord, Karasjok, Porsanger and Tysfjord.  The Norwegian government has a goal of securing the Sámi language to be a active and living language.

This is seen as important in order to develop the Sámi culture in Norway.

The Norwegian Folks Museum (Norsk Folkemuseum) in Oslo has since 1958 had a permanent Sami exhibition. The exhibition is a popular and important part of the museum.




Photo: Jørn Tomter - Finnmark Reiseliv


From Sami communities to other towns and places.